About

The York Region Environmental Alliance (YREA) is a not-for-profit, registered chariatable organization (#84559 0553 RR0001). Our hands on volunteer board of directors hails from the far reaches of York Region and approves, oversees, and is directly involved with YREA projects. We have a dedicated membership and volunteer base. 3 part-time staff administer our day-to-day activities.

YREA Board of Directors

YREA Board of Directors

Formed in 1999 to initially campaign against the cosmetic use of pesticides, the York Region Environmental Alliance (YREA) has continually expanded its mandate to address ecological issues that impact our health and the health of our environment.

We are now in the process of shaping YREA into a model organization which other groups across Ontario and Canada can emulate. Our three-year capacity building strategic plans include:

  • an expansion of our communication and outreach network
  • the building of our volunteer and support base
  • the development of an e-library as a source of public environmental information

    YREA Staff

    YREA Staff

1 Response » to “About”

  1. Keith Cleveland says:

    From: Keith Cleveland
    Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2010 6:01 AM
    To: Jack Gibbons ; contact@cleanairalliance.org ; Angela@cleanairalliance.org
    Subject: Ontario Carbon Air Alliance

    How can you say that you do not support “peaker plants” when you know full well that industrial wind turbines require peaker plants when attached to the grid?
    Your support for “small-scale, high-efficiency natural gas-fired combined heat and power plants” would be ON TOP of the requirement for the peaker plants.
    How do you sleep at night? Might I suggest a name change:
    The Ontario Carbon Air Alliance

    From: “keithcleveland”
    To: “Jack Gibbons” ;
    ;
    Sent: Friday, December 03, 2010 9:40 AM
    Subject: RE: Wind and fossil

    All I hear is that you support fossil fuels.

    This does not help the fight against climate change.

    From: Jack Gibbons
    Sent: Friday, December 03, 2010 8:59 AM
    To: ‘Keith Cleveland’ ; contact@cleanairalliance.org ; Angela@cleanairalliance.org
    Subject: RE: Wind and fossil

    Hi Keith,
    Thanks for your message.
    The Ontario Clean Air Alliance worked very hard with MEGAWHAT to try to stop the gas-fired peaker plant in King Township. While we support small-scale, high-efficiency natural gas-fired combined heat and power plants we do NOT support peaker plants which have an energy efficiency of only 37%.
    If you click on the following links you will find a lot of information about our campaign against the Northern York Region peaker plant: http://www.cleanairalliance.org/nyr.
    Jack
    Jack Gibbons
    Chair, Ontario Clean Air Alliance
    625 Church Street, Suite 402
    Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2G1

    Tel: 416-926-1907 ext. 240
    Fax: 416-926-1601
    Email: jack@cleanairalliance.org
    Web sites:
    http://www.cleanairalliance.org
    http://www.ontariosgreenfuture.ca

    From: Keith Cleveland [mailto:keithcleveland@hurontel.on.ca]
    Sent: December-02-10 9:30 PM
    To: Jack Gibbons; contact@cleanairalliance.org; Angela@cleanairalliance.org
    Subject: Re: Wind and fossil

    You people should be ashamed of yourselves taking advantage of people like this. Here you have groups like MEGAWHAT trying to stop gas plants giving money to you guys yet you act like a mouthpiece to the gas industry.
    “But we can’t do it overnight.“ What happened to “Because action on climate change can’t wait” on your banner?

    From: Jack Gibbons
    Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2010 2:03 PM
    To: ‘Keith Cleveland’ ; contact@cleanairalliance.org ; Angela@cleanairalliance.org
    Subject: RE: Wind and fossil

    Hi Keith,
    In my opinion, we have a huge potential to pair up Ontario wind with Quebec’s hydro-electric reservoirs. It is important to remember that Quebec is the 4th largest producer of hydro-power in the world.
    Since 2003, we have made dramatic progress in reducing Ontario’s electricity-related greenhouse gas emissions. While I agree that natural gas generation is not perfect, it is dramatically cleaner than coal.
    I agree with you that our long-term goal must be to get off fossil fuels. But we can’t do it overnight. As part of our strategy to dramatically reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, I think we should switch from dirtier to cleaner fossil fuels. But when we do switch to cleaner fossil fuels, as part of a transition strategy to a renewable future, we should use the fossil fuel as efficiently as possible. That is why we are advocating for combined heat and power natural gas-fired power plants. They have an overall energy efficiency of 80 to 90% versus the 33% efficiency of the Nanticoke coal plant.
    Jack
    Jack Gibbons
    Chair, Ontario Clean Air Alliance
    625 Church Street, Suite 402
    Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2G1

    Tel: 416-926-1907 ext. 240
    Fax: 416-926-1601
    Email: jack@cleanairalliance.org
    Web sites:
    http://www.cleanairalliance.org
    http://www.ontariosgreenfuture.ca

    From: Keith Cleveland [mailto:keithcleveland@hurontel.on.ca]
    Sent: December-02-10 1:24 PM
    To: Jack Gibbons; contact@cleanairalliance.org; Angela@cleanairalliance.org
    Subject: Re: Wind and fossil

    What I see on page 7 is “Ontario’s need to build new high-cost natural gas-fired power plants to provide peak power on hot summer days will also be reduced.”
    A reduction in the need to build “new” plants. What about the “old” plants?
    You can pair wind with hydro-electric to a certain degree until you start creating more problems.
    What about the rest? Where do you stop? We’re still not reducing our need for fossil fuels. The more wind turbines that get built, the more we will be stuck with fossil fuels.
    I see that cart is still up ahead of the horse. Not seeing a whole lot of clean air either.

    From: Jack Gibbons
    Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2010 12:11 PM
    To: ‘Keith Cleveland’ ; contact@cleanairalliance.org ; Angela@cleanairalliance.org
    Subject: RE: Wind and fossil

    Hi Keith,
    Thanks for your message.
    I agree with you that building gas-fired peaker plants in Ontario to back-up wind doesn’t make sense.
    However, Hydro Quebec’s hydro-electric reservoirs are the perfect “battery” for Ontario’s wind power.
    Please see page 7 of the attached report.
    Jack
    Jack Gibbons
    Chair, Ontario Clean Air Alliance
    625 Church Street, Suite 402
    Toronto, Ontario M4Y 2G1

    Tel: 416-926-1907 ext. 240
    Fax: 416-926-1601
    Email: jack@cleanairalliance.org
    Web sites:
    http://www.cleanairalliance.org
    http://www.ontariosgreenfuture.ca

    From: Keith Cleveland [mailto:keithcleveland@hurontel.on.ca]
    Sent: December-02-10 11:39 AM
    To: contact@cleanairalliance.org; jack@cleanairalliance.org; Angela@cleanairalliance.org
    Subject: Wind and fossil

    “You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time.” – attributed to Honest Abe Lincoln.

    We’ve been had. Hoodwinked. Duped. Conned. Fooled. The wool over my eyes is starting to itch. The ONLY way we can reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the potential devastating effects of global warming and climate change is by leaving fossil fuels right where we found them: buried underground or deep in our oceans.

    Harnessing wind energy could help us achieve that goal, but ONLY if the energy produced is somehow stored so it can be used when needed; such as in a battery bank. That is not happening.
    Without storing the energy produced by wind we are actually making matters worse. We are actually INCREASING our dependency on fossil fuels. That sounds pretty stupid when you first hear it, but when you look at how the electricity grid works it becomes crystal clear. Wind turbines need to be paired with fossil turbines to make it work. Supply has to match demand or the grid collapses. Only fossil fits the bill. The more wind turbines that get erected the more fossil generation we need. The hope is that “one day” we’ll solve the storage issue. Problem is, if we don’t, we’re stuck with fossil generation because of wind energy. Talk about putting the cart before the horse.

    This is wrong.

    Check this out:

    Robert F Kennedy Jr. – Solar Thermal and Utility Scale Wind are Gas Plants
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcm1gmPL50s
    Keith Cleveland
    Ripley, ON

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